Archives for March 2017

Freebird, no wait, Freewrite

The Freewrite ships this month (March)

I heard about it from a friend who brought me the information about the Freewrite from CES.

The Freewrite I am fascinated by these products.  The Freewrite is a light typewriter with a handle (the portable typewriter I took to college also had a handle, and doubled as a resistance weights every time I hauled it onto a desk).  But it’s not all about the handle.  This new, new writing miracle also provides a  long battery life and “seamless cloud backups”  According to the postcard on my desk,  the key board has old fashion typewriter action.  But best of all “ this new product provides a minimalist, distraction free environment to help you write “now” and edit later.”

“Get back to the simplicity of writing without losing the benefits of modern technology.”

This is not the first word processor of it’s kind. I owned an AlphaSmart for a couple of years as an inexpensive alternative to my heavy lap top.  It worked pretty well on overseas trips, until I needed a lap top to keep up with my consulting work.   Oh, and my husband informed me that at 7:00 AM, the Alphasmart  key board was noisy.

There is another favorite in this category, The Pomera DM100, but apparently you must be gentle when using the key board.

I have broken keyboards, gentle is not my middle name.

The large, overriding feature of these  light typewriters is  they offer  a distraction free writing environment, or as   Mashable’s   Christina Warren and Karissa Bell  commented, more “pretentious hipster nonsense.”

Which is what is so darn interesting.  Why are we so distracted?  Why can’t we just write?

There are many laptop programs and apps available  that help with distraction free writing.  Timers, blocks, screens, all in the service of “distraction” free writing.  As if the refrigerator wasn’t doing its job.

Distraction free writing has its place.  I used to work at a beach cabin on the west coast: no wifi, no signals of any kind, include cell service.  Drove my friends nuts.  But I loved it.   It had the advantage of blocking all my distractions along with providing a spectacular view. That was distracting.

The advantage of working all connected is the ability to search for a word exactly when you need it.  You can also quickly confirm a place, historical note or name.

Here is the disadvantage:  It’s never quick.

Like I said in the research blog – research is fun, and often like falling into a rabbit hole.  And you want to write for heaven’s sake.

Enter, new machines for that very activity.

It’s like a Fit Bit for your word count:  Specific, new, expensive, hip(ster).

If you invest in one of these lovely machines I absolutely believe you will write more.  I also believe that the last blank pages of an old college notebook will also provide distraction free writing.  I also believe that, in a pinch, the back of a Costco receipt provides plenty of space for most poems due to it’s unavoidable length.

But in Freewrite’s defense, typing is the best way we have to keep up with our thoughts.  The words  travel directly from our brain to an editable  document. 

Go distraction free and double your word count, is what Freewrite promises.

Or drive to the coast.

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The Fun of Fake Research and How to Avoid It

We know what we believe and no pile of facts or expert opinions will propel us out of our comfortable Lazy-Boy of certitude.

But we are missing one of the greatest joys of writing: research.research in times of Fake News

Even if you disagree with every fact you uncover, research is fun, researching for a book or article can become the project itself, every bit as agreeable as an afternoon spent on Pinterest.

Oh look, puppies!

I teach a class on critical thinking and writing so much of my rant about research and the veracity there in, is to prevent students from  quoting urban legends or common wisdom, or FOX news.  Yes, you say, still seated comfortably, perhaps pulling a beer from the cooler embedded into the chair arm, but research is just for academics, I write fiction, no need to research, it’s my world building against yours.

That was BG.  Before Google.  In the happy past, women knew their place, white men made a living wage tightening wing nuts and  fiction writers used to be more or less exempt from research, it was our world after all, get over it.  But like the wing-nut tightening business, the industry changed.     

Everyone can look up everything.  Which means that you, the author, need to be more diligent with your facts and claims and yes, do more research, which will lead to the problem stated above, the more you love the research, the fewer words will end up in your final book.

So we have two challenges:  You need to do research, but  the research will quickly take on a life of its own through no fault of yours (puppies).

What to do?

  1. Haul yourself out of the recliner.
  2. Limit the research to three credible sources.
  3. Look for consensus and then just write from there.

Credible?  How the heck can I know what is credible?

Ask a couple of questions about the site, or journal, or white paper you’ve just encountered on your digging search:

Commercial or Academic? 

Is the information you found   just advertising copy?  Double check against another site to be sure.    

Links to corroborating sites.

Look for links to other sites – often academic and legitimate sites cheerfully link to more information or to deeper sources.  Flow the links from  one site to the next to next.

For an academic paper your goal is to find the original sources, kind of like finding the source of the Amazon.  Sometimes it feels like it takes that long as well but it’s worth it, just to be very clear.

Can you find the original article? ( I’m looking at you Huffington Post.)

Dig deep and find the original article or journal rather than just believing, and quoting, the first time you see the comment.   

Yes, you can start with Wikipedia

Believe it or not, as much as academic denigrate Wikipedia  Wikipedia isn’t a bad way to start  your research.  Just don’t end there.  Ever.  Yet, the OED was essentially crowd sourced, and Wikipedia is gaining legitimacy.  However, I’m still a fan of digging deeper.

Contact the author.

Is there an email?  Can you contact the author of the web site or journal article?  Can you ask them a direct question about what you need to know?  Probably. Give it a try. You know yourself that you love to be considered an expert in your field, give that compliment to another author, they may respond with   great information.   

Or did the author of the web site post  a selfie  wearing a colander covered in tin foil? A professional tip: don’t reference that site.

If you are writing  fiction, you may want to write the novel first, then research only what you need to research. That will help narrow your search and allow you time to actually write, rather than  just research as fun as it is.

Oh, and did you know you can create pin boards that track your research, discuss your work in progress and are all about your book?   Sorry.  Now you’ll never get that book started . . . But aren’t the puppies cute?  Make a Pinterest board.

Your Book Starts Here web siteTo learn more.
Visit us on iTunes – Newbie Writers Podcast
For the greatest yet unassuming information on writing and social for authors
Subscribe to the blog
Sign up for the quarterly newsletter
Follow us on Newbie Writers Group on Facebook
Instagram #catharineBramkampWriter
Pinterest Catharine Bramkamp
And THANK YOU

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